Day

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

LocationCarleton University: MacOdrum Library, Discovery Centre room 481
Session title

Workshop 1: Introduction to Global Mapper

Session abstract
This hands-on half-day workshop will introduce participants to Global Mapper, an affordable and easy-to-use GIS application that provides just the right level of functionality to satisfy both experienced GIS professionals and beginning users. This is a great mapping tool to use with students who have little to no experience using GIS software. The workshop will provide step-by-step instructions on how to easily process common GIS datasets such as shapefiles and AutoCAD, allow participants to import and export elevation data in a variety of formats, and quickly produce 3D paths and profiles. Once the workshop is complete, participants will know how to effectively perform a variety of tasks that are more complicated or time-consuming in other GIS software packages.
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LUNCH

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Lunch will be provided.
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Workshop 2: Geocoding & Online Mapping

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This hands-on workshop/hackfest will allow participants to collaboratively explore various geocoding and online mapping tools. Come join us as we tackle and work-out the best workflow and tools for specific uses for our users. Once we’re done, we’ll compile all the results and share them with the group.
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ICEBREAKER

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395 Wellington Street, Ottawa, 2nd Floor
Day

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

LocationUniversity of Ottawa: Morisset Hall, Room 218, 65 University Private
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Welcome to uOttawa and Carto 2015

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Keynote: Using Spatial Data to Tell Important Stories

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With federal, provincial and municipal governments and agencies making geographic data increasingly available, journalists have access to a wealth of information that helps them tell stories. These stories tell us about where and how people live, how governments spend money, and the locations of environmental hot spots such as contaminated sites and air pollution. Unfortunately, too few journalists know how to harness this information. Fortunately, this reality is shifting.
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BREAK

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Using Map Labs to Make our Collection More Accessible

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We’ve all experienced it – you provide materials for a reference request, the client leaves and you put everything away. Shortly after, there’s a duplicate request from someone in the same class. The penny drops and you realize you can leave the materials “on display”. Just add a course sign & description and you’ve got a Map Lab! These have been one our most popular tools for keeping our paper map collection active. An easily customizable and traditional way to offer “added value” to our university community.
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Don’t Fade Away: Utilizing Web Maps to Highlight, Reveal and Promote Map Libraries Collections and Research

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Web maps are ubiquitous today. GeoPortals or geospatial portals are also abundant. Related but slightly different, creating and employing web maps with scanned images of map libraries historic paper/print collections laid over current imagery can highlight, reveal and promote map libraries collections and research. Some examples of constructed interactive web maps with before and after scenarios which display historic aerial photography and maps will be discussed. Some technical aspects of building web maps will also be deliberated as well as philosophical considerations.
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GIS Gone Viral? Engaging Students with Instructional GIS Videos

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In 2011 the U of T Mississauga Library created a block of 2-3 minute instructional videos to assist students using GIS software, many for the first time. Today, several of these videos have had over 30,000 views, with one video clocking in over 80,000 views!
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LUNCH

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Lunch not provided.
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Prescription Conservation: A Preventative and Post Remedy for Users of Maps

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To a collection of maps, researchers and users are like getting wisdom teeth pulled - it has to happen, but there will be suffering. Damage caused by handling, display, and scanning results in tears, lost information, staining, and in general leaves maps in poor condition. Overuse of these artifacts renders them in such a state that they cannot be viewed without crumbling, much less be digitized. No one wants to deny access to their collections because the maps are ‘on sick leave’. The remedy is Conservation Treatment, but much like choosing a course of action to cure a serious malady, there are many issues to consider. Risks and success rates must be weighed against costs and the end use of the map. When it comes to treatment, the only way to make the right decision, is to be armed with knowledge.
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Lost and Fo(u)nd: Map and Visual Literacy in the Archives

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Have you ever looked at a photo and wondered where it was taken? Have used an interactive map to browse historical photos, letters, newspaper articles, or pamphlets? Have you ever thought: wouldn’t it be great if we could do something like that at my institution? Or help instructors implement this in their courses? Online technologies and platforms such as Google Earth, History Pin, Neatline for Omeka, make it easy to display the geographic location of digital objects. In addition, libraries and archives with digital collection platforms such as DSpace or Islandora can enhance their metadata by including geographic coordinates of digital objects. But there is a catch…the challenge is determining the geographic location of a photo (or objects) and to do it precisely and accurately. For several years, the Map and GIS Librarian at York University has partnered with archivists at the Clara Thomas Archives and Special collections, to geo-locate several their fonds. Using examples from the Clara Thomas Archives and Special Collections, this presentation will challenge you to look for critically at digital objects (such as landscape photos) and look for clues that can be used to “geolocate” the objects. The presentation will discuss the core set of information, visual, and map literacy skills that are required to geo-locate objects; provide suggestions on types of information sources that can be used to geo-locate objects, and highlight the role and expertise of a Map/GIS/ information professionals in geo-location projects.
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BREAK

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Facilitating Interpretation: The User’s Experience of Library and Archives Canada’s Early Cartography Collection

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Library and Archives Canada’s (LAC) early cartography collection dates back to the founding of the Archives Branch of the Department of Agriculture in 1872. It is an impressive collection, today composed of more than 60,000 maps, plans, and charts of national significance. This collection of historical cartographic records provides a comprehensive visual context for the nation’s geographic, economic, political, scientific, social and cultural development from early exploration to confederation. The question is, how can users “read” these graphic and quantitative representations of Canadian history?
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From Open Data to Online Exhibits: Mapping Canada’s History with Omeka

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This past spring, University of Ottawa librarians partnered with a uOttawa history professor and curator from the Canadian Science and Technology Museum to explore how fourth year history students could learn how to make use of open datasets, curate cultural collections, and geocode their artifacts. Assignments in the course were focused on the creation of online exhibits using Omeka. This open source content management system allows users to build complex narratives and share rich collections, all while adhering to Dublin Core metadata standards. Catalogue records from the Museum’s collection of geographic survey markers were ingested into Omeka as a starting point for the student exhibits. In this presentation, we will discuss our process for extracting this information from the original XML file, enhancing the records with geospatial information, and working with Omeka. We will also discuss Neatline, an Omeka extension that provides support for highly interactive map-based exhibits.
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L’expédition Coppermine de John Franklin: de l’aventure cartographique à l’aventure éditoriale

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Le conférencier fait une mise en contexte du développement de la collection de sources documentaires fondatrices en études nordiques à la Bibliothèque de l’Université Laval, dans laquelle les documents cartographiques occupent une place de choix, et situe l’ouvrage lié à la première expédition de John Franklin dans cet ensemble. Il relate les grands événements de l’expédition Coppermine (1819-1922) et présente les caractéristiques physiques du livre de 1823 Narrative of A Journey to the Shores of the Polar Sea en s’intéressant au travail de l’éditeur John Murray. Les cartes géographiques retiennent particulièrement l’attention, non seulement pour leur contenu, mais aussi pour leur forte valeur symbolique. L’importance de la mise en valeur de ce type de documents par les bibliothécaires est mise de l’avant.
Day

Thursday, June 18th, 2015

LocationUniversity of Ottawa: Morisset Hall, Room 218, 65 University Private
Session title

Leveraging Location for Greater Impact and Engagement

Session abstract
United Ways around the world are evolving in response to changing demographics, increased demand for social services and donors who want evidence of the impact of their investment. Using spatial analysis, compelling visuals and expansive data, United Way’s can create a tangible foundation for strategic decision making and in-turn, inform and drive collective community impact.
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Aerial Ortho-Mosaics at the City of Ottawa

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This presentation will examine the images on the City of Ottawa’s geoOttawa web site. More specifically, it will look at how individual images are prepared for display in the geo-referenced frame. For years, the local municipality has systematically flown and captured aerial images of the Ottawa area. Additionally, since the 1920s, aerial reconnaissance has captured the landscape from above. With these images, continuous seamless geo-referenced images are created and displayed within GIS software and on-line. The creation of these images seem trivial, however, there is an art and science to the preparation and presentation of these aerial images. This will include a discussion of ortho-rectification, mosaicing, blending, seamlines and dodging.
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A Collaboration to Represent Child Poverty in Winnipeg

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To enhance the capacity of the libraries to offer tutorials and workshops in multimedia object creation, the participation of technicians, librarians and researchers across the two UM campuses and within the greater community was solicited on a pilot project on poverty. In the first collaboration undertaken, discovery of and access to data from the national Community Data Program, the City of Winnipeg, and uncatalogued UM datasets was made. Poverty was selected as the pilot’s topic since UM plans to offer an interdisciplinary program on Human Rights, and since poverty is a current and growing problem here and across Canada. Researchers with little or no GIS experience but with a wealth of expertise on poverty joined in the collaboration. In Winnipeg, many children 17 years and younger are living in poverty or extreme poverty. By census tract, trends in child poverty, as indicated by LIM-AT, are presented between 2005 and 2012. The distribution, concentrations, and geographic clustering of child poverty are analyzed for children in general, for Aboriginal children, racialized children and children of recent immigrants. Other indicators that may co-occur with poverty are presented by neighborhood, as well. They include social and material neighbourhood deprivation, health indicators, median shelter costs and change over time, housing tenure by type, housing condition and suitability, patterns of residential tenure and migrancy, percentage of lone-parent households and median highest educational attainment. Neighborhoods where indicators are improving are discussed, as are opportunities for other neighborhoods.
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BREAK

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Keeping an Eye on our Historical Topos!: a Collaborative OCUL Geo Project

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In Ontario, the OCUL Geo Community has embarked on a project to digitize topographic maps of Ontario located in the collections of member libraries. As part of this project these maps will be digitized, georeferenced, described using standard metadata, and made available through online platforms such as Scholars GeoPortal. In order to do this, the Geo Community must make decisions about the appropriate digitization and georeferencing practices for these maps, which are modern (twentieth century), accurate, government-produced maps. This project has facilitated discussion around accuracy needs, tool availability, metadata, staff resources, and the trade-offs that must be made . These discussions have provided some interesting insights and ideas about the importance of georeferencing of digitized collections, to meet both research needs and library needs for web-based discovery systems. This discussion will provide an overview of current practices in Ontario libraries, and suggest potential unmet needs and opportunities for collaboration.
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LUNCH / AGM

Session abstract
Lunch provided for ACMLA-ACACC members.
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Peer Review and Evaluation: The Future of the ACMLA Bulletin

Session abstract
Since the appearance of the first scientific journals more than 300 years ago, peer review has been a formal part of scientific communication. Today, the peer review system results in over 1.5 million scholarly articles published each year and is fundamental to the appropriate validation of scientific findings. Because it indicates that research has been eva luated by an independent panel of experts in the field, peer review is also an important consideration for membership in the scholarly community. Drawing inspiration from well-established peer review journals in library and information sciences, I will present selected best practices (and possible topics) for a special peer review edition of the ACMLA Bulletin, the association's scholarly journal, which will be published in Spring/Summer 2016 in celebration of the association’s 50th anniversary.
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Student Paper - Capitalist Cartography: Road Mapping in Interwar Canada

Session abstract
Road maps do not only show people how to get from A to B; they also include capitalist messages that have the power to influence and persuade. This was especially true in Canada during the interwar period (1919-1939), which was a time of soaring private automobile ownership and road construction, and with this, an increasing use of road maps. At their surface, road maps provided motorists with useful geographic and navigational information. At closer observation, businesses and governments used road maps as devices to advance capitalism. They did this in three ways: they used maps to advertise products and ventures, they incorporated information in maps to promote auto travel, and they used strategic cartographic design to persuade travel along certain routes and to certain destinations. These practices evolved over the interwar period and by mid-century they were ubiquitous in Canadian road mapping.
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BREAK

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Twine: Gaming Technology Applied to Self-Directed Learning at the University of Guelph’s Data Resource Centre

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The Data Resource Centre (DRC) at the University of Guelph helps undergraduate and graduate students, staff and faculty of all disciplines find and make use of a wide range of data. We are able to provide our users with direct support through appointments, workshops and guest lectures but we felt that our patrons could also benefit from independent study options. Creating engaging learning objects has long been a part of our mandate. We needed to find some way to repurpose educational video modules created by team members into a more current and interactive format. The solution to our quest appeared with Twine (an open source program that allows the author to create text based ‘choose-your-own-adventure’ type modules) after a meeting on using gaming technology in education. Once created, these modules are then exported as .html files with minimal programming knowledge required for their development. The platform is very robust and allows for different media types (video, PowerPoint presentations, web-maps, and images) to be embedded directly into the modules. Because these modules are non-linear, it is possible for the user to have a more customized experience based on their needs. We are currently implementing Twine modules into the Data Resource Centre’s service model.
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Developing a Historical GIS partnership in Canada

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Leveraging Support through Spatial Literacy Instruction

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Increasing reliance on data visualization and emerging disciplines the digital humanities reflect the growing popularity of using large datasets and geographic information systems (GIS) to demonstrate outcomes. While it is increasingly common to see GIS used across disciplines by researchers, GIS and geospatial data may be less known among library staff. The Scholars GeoPortal, ArcGIS Online and other web-based mapping alternatives afford an incredible opportunity for beginner GIS users to visualize and explore spatial data, perform simple analyses, and create maps that can be easily shared without downloading software. While these technologies have been leveraged by students, the potential to educate staff and improve spatial literacy is vast. “A Very Spatial Data Session” was designed for giving library staff an introductory understanding of GIS, spatial data and to prepare staff to recognize questions as geospatial in nature. This workshop aims to describe the level and content covered in “A Very Spatial Data Session” as well as demonstrate the context in which staff sessions can be used to leverage support.
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BANQUET

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Signatures Restaurant at the Cordon Bleu, 453 Laurier Avenue East, Ottawa
Day

Friday, June 19th, 2015

LocationUniversity of Ottawa: Morisset Hall, Room 218, 65 University Private
Session title

An Introduction to Dataverse

Session abstract
Dataverse is an open source web application to share, preserve, cite, explore and analyze research data. It facilitates making data available to others, and allows researchers, data authors, publishers, data distributors, and affiliated institutions to receive appropriate credit. The benefits of using Dataverse, include sharing data easily with other researchers that does not involve the use of email or Dropbox, providing a simplified approach to entering project-level metadata, minting DOIs for data files that can be used in publications, managing multiple versions of data files, and organizing data to submit for its long term preservation.
Session title

3D Printing Geospatial Data: An Introduction

Session abstract
This paper will investigate the application of 3D printing processes to GIS data in the context of an academic library. As 3D printing becomes more accessible to a broad audience, it is now being used in conjunction with GIS data by industry, academia and amateur Makers. This paper shall focus on practices emergent in Maker discourse, much of which is easily and freely accessible online and is generally accessible to the novice user; it shall also discuss emerging applications in academia and industry. This paper will compare the processes of working from DEMs and from contour lines, and discuss implications of data scale for the printed output. It shall review software and data transformation requirements, as well as printing devices. Conscious of budgetary constraints facing libraries today, emphasis shall be given to free and/or open software and data sources, as well as tools likely to be available to academic institutions such as Esri’s ArcGIS software. The end goal of this paper is to develop a set of instructions or guidelines for creating print-ready 3D models from GIS data in the context of an academic library, drawing on the author’s own experiences.
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Closing Remarks

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Visit to University of Ottawa’s makerspace

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Field Trip to Library and Archives Canada Preservation Centre - 625 du Carrefour Boulevard, Gatineau

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ACMLA Conference attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a guided tour of Library and Archives Canada’s Preservation Centre on the afternoon of June 19. During the visit, participants will get the chance to tour the centre’s large format vault with maps, photo albums, prints and drawings; the B&W film and microfilm vault; the textual vault; and art vault. Conservation specialists and cartographic archivists will be on hand to provide their expert knowledge on the context of creation as well as the preservation of cartographic treasures from our collection that span centuries from the first representations of Canada to modern published maps. These maps will be in conservation labs where participants will get a chance to have an up-close look at maps dating from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. While touring the art vault, participants will also be able to examine LAC’s collection of globes dating back to the seventeenth century. LAC recently completed a comprehensive survey of the globe collection to determine globes at risk and develop a plan for conservation treatment and improved housing. Conservation specialists will discuss this process and highlight some of the special items from the globe collection.